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Dangers of the flu, by Dr. Zach Levine

BT Montreal | posted Tuesday, Jan 16th, 2018

Flu —   caused by influenza virus

Virus shedding begins day before symptoms appear and lasts 5-7 days.  Most infective on 2nd and 3rd days after infection.  Correlated with fever.    (re shedding – shouldn’t go to work)

Every year 10-25% of canadians get flu and 500-1500 die from it

Virus lives longer with low humidity and lack of sunlight.  15 min on tissues, 5 min on skin, 1-2 days on plastic or metal.  Mucus protects (up to 17 days on banknotes!)

can include fever or feeling feverish/chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches and fatigue

Get the shot!  Safe for pregnant and breastfeeding women

 

See doc if sob, chest pain, drowsy, neck stiff, fever in infant less than 3 months, not urinating

 

Tamiflu/oseltamivir.  Best if given within 48hrs.  Lessens symptoms and shortens illness 1-2 days.  Can be used as prophylaxis if exposed.

Give to ppl with chronic dz (lung dz, cancer, liver dz, kidney dz, dm, smokers, 65+)

 

Remember you can infect others, even if you take meds and feel better

Prevention with hand washing, cough into bend of elbow

 

Flu shot (shot is dead virus, nasal is live weakened, only for ages 2-49):  everyone 6 months and older can get.  takes 2 weeks to gain immunity.  Can get if chicken egg allergy unless severe — if worried, 1/10th the dose and observe 30 min before giving the rest.

Some people get soreness, or mild flulike sx.

Caregivers should get it.

A typical cough shoots out jets of air several feet long, along with around 3,000 droplets of saliva at speeds of up to 50mph.

Sneezes typically contain as many as 40,000 droplets, some which leave the body at more than 100mph.

In moist air, these particles may remain relatively large, and drop to the floor. But in dry air, they break up into smaller pieces – eventually becoming so small that they can stay aloft for hours.  Moistness itself also hurts the virus.

The mask’s effectiveness is also heavily dependent on how the illness is transmitted. For airborne viruses and bugs expelled from the body in large droplets, the mask may be your best bet. The trouble is, the flu and other ailments aren’t only spread in this manner. One study found that 65 percent of viruses spread among flu patients consisted of small particles. Unfortunately, the generic face mask is not airtight and cannot offer protection against these smaller particles. That means that if a sick person sitting next to you coughs, you can catch their ailment regardless of if you’re wearing a mask or not.

The CDC wrote in its H1N1 flu advisory that “facemasks help stop droplets from being spread by the person wearing them. They also keep splashes or sprays from reaching the mouth and nose of the person wearing them. They are not designed to protect against breathing in the very small particle aerosols that may contain viruses.”

Also, the CDC reminds us that the flu’s most effective avenue of transmission is not the air but via direct contact with an infected individual. For example, drinking from a glass that was shared with a sick person, or touching your mouth after touching a surface also touched by a sick individual is not only more likely to get you infected but is something the mask offers absolutely no protection against.